Call for Papers

Educational Technology & Society. Call for Manuscripts for Special Issue:

Learning Analytics in Technology Enhanced Language Learning

        

(5-Year impact factor 1.376 according to Thomson Scientific 2014 Journal Citations Report)

Special issue publication date: April 2017

Submissions of initial papers due: 15 March 2016 15 April 2016

Objectives

Language learning is a lifelong issue in the new era. From primary school to college and workplace settings, foreign language (FL) proficiency is highly valued as a requisite feature of participating competitively in the international community. To echo the trend featured in global FL learning, multiple modalities of technology enhanced language learning (TELL) are offered to satisfy diverse needs of FL learners. The various modalities can be briefly classified based on different perspectives as below:

1. Formality: formal, informal
2. Timeliness: synchronous, asynchronous
3. Reality: real world, virtual reality, augmented reality
4. Mobility: mobile, ubiquitous, specific location
5. Openness: regular class schedule, MOOCs, open courseware

No matter which perspectives are adopted, without doubt, competency acquisition of the target language should be the main focus in FL learning. Furthermore, three components in successful FL learning are essential and cannot be omitted: learners, goals, and contexts. Obviously, the information that can assist the FL learners, educators, and researchers to meaningfully take the above-mentioned components into account simultaneously would be of critical importance to successful FL learning

The learner component includes the specific characteristics of each individual which will influence learners’ second language acquisition, including learners’ ages, learning styles, nationalities, motivation, learning goals, the experience in foreign language learning, learning behaviors, learners’ metacognition (Self-regulation, self-estimation, etc.), and available learning time. The language educators and researchers definitely need the information to help them take as many as learner variables into account for providing the FL learners with successful learning in all possible TELL modalities.

Regarding the goal component, learners and educators/researchers are the two sides of FL education, and thus they wouldn’t be discussed separately. For FL educators/researchers, the information for assisting them to decide whether the goals of pedagogical syllabus are reached is as important as that for the FL learners to be perceptual about their success/failure in FL learning. The techniques of assessment interpretation for supporting the decision making by educators/researchers and learners, in the meanwhile, are also important and definitely should be valued whichever the TELL modalities are adopted by the educators/researchers or learners.

The last component, contexts, can be viewed as all the perceived phenomena including the physical surroundings in which language happens. It can be the learning platforms/systems or environments (real or virtual) in which the FL learners receive input or produce output of the target language. Additionally, language input from the environment, including contextual and non-linguistic cues, is easy to be comprehended by an L2 learner because it is in a low stress situation. Consequently, context-based FL learning is valued and emphasized in the issue of FL education and research in recent years. However, the more authentic the learning environment is, the more difficult it is for FL educators/researchers to collect and evaluate the learning process, achievement, or the behavior of the FL learners. Consequently, a technique to real-timely provide both educators/researchers and learners with a clear explanation of FL learners’ learning log, without a doubt, would be a great help in improving the outcome of FL teaching and learning.

As described at the beginning, there are various options of the modalities which fit the FL learners’ learning needs the best. At the same time, the complete learning process of the FL learners mostly recorded, whichever the modalities are adopted, in the digital era becomes the BIG DATA. Consequently, the huge volume of data produced by the leaners are so BIG that it turns to be difficult to handle and interpret via the traditional approach to provide the learners, educators, and researchers with meaningful and critical information related to the three above-mentioned essential components in FL learning. Unfortunately, it is obvious that simply providing an overwhelming amount of information does not satisfy the needs of FL learners, educators, and researchers. In a word, developing more advanced techniques to better address FL learning is an important and urgent research issue in FL learning and teaching. Using learning analytics is considered as a common way to deal with the situations mentioned above and that is why this journal calls for this special issue.

Learning analytics refers to the technique to analyze the existing, learner-produced data for assessing academic progress, predicting future performance, giving suggestions, and spotting potential issues. Through adopting learning analytics technique, it is possible for educators and researchers to better assess FL learners’ academic progress, predict future performance, provide suggestions, and to spot potential issues. Subsequently, it can enable educators to better satisfy L2 learners’ needs, predict L2 learning behaviors and outcomes, and provide L2 learners with personalized and adaptive learning. Additionally, through data visualization, L2 learners, educators, and researchers can real-timely understand and improve learning and teaching.

To this end, this special issue aims at providing a platform for researchers to present their study efforts that may offer insights into the potential of using learning analytics to analyze language learning in different modalities and scenarios. These are open questions worth of further explorations. The submitted papers will go through a double-blind review. We invite studies that provide research results and contributions that may help develop further understanding of learning analytics and language learning and inspire future research directions.

Topics of interests include, but are not limited to:

  • Big data analytics in language learning
  • Learning analytics in FL learning process and behavior
  • Learning analytics and social language learning
  • Learning analytics framework for language learning
  • Learning analytics and language education
  • Monitoring, explaining, and predicting FL learners’ learning
  • Language education analytics
  • Learning analytics in ubiquitous FL learning
  • Learning analytics in multimodal communication in virtual worlds
  • Learning analytics in game-based FL learning
  • Learning analytics in FL learning in schools and beyond
  • Visualizations in learning analytics in FL learning
  • Ethical issues of learning analytics in FL learning
  • Methods for using learning analytics in FL learning

Submission Guidelines and Other considerations

This special issue will only publish original research papers (up to 7000 words). Papers submitted must not have been published previously or under consideration for publication, though they may represent significant extensions of prior work. All submitted papers will go through a rigorous double-blind peer-review process (with at least three reviewers).

Before submission, authors should carefully read over the journal’s Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.ifets.info/guide.php. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript using EasyChair system at:
https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sietslall2016.

Timeline

Submissions of initial papers due: 15 March 2016 15 April 2016
Decisions based on the double blind review process: 20 May 2016 20 June 2016
Revised manuscripts due: 30 June 2016 30 July 2016
Feedback on revised manuscripts: 30 August 2016
Final manuscripts due by the authors: 30 September 2016
Final manuscripts sent to the publishers: 31 October 2016
Special Issue Publication: 30 April 2017

Lead Guest Editor

Dr. Yu-Ju LAN, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan, 162. Heping East Road Section 1, Taipei 106, Taiwan, R.O.C. Email: yujulan@gmail.com

Guest editors

Dr. Nian-Shing CHEN, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan. 70 Lienhai Rd., Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, R.O.C. Email: nschen@mis.nsysu.edu.tw
Dr. Yao-Ting SUNG, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan. 162, Heping East Road Section 1, Taipei 106, Taiwan, R.O.C. Email: sungtc@ntnu.edu.tw


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Call for Papers

Important dates

  • Submissions of initial papers due: March 31, 2015
  • Aceptance notifications: April 10, 2015
  • Early Bird Registration: April 30, 2015
  • Final version deadline: April 30, 2015
  • LATALL2015 Workshop: June 23-24, 2015

2015 International Workshop on Learning Analytics, Technology Adoption, and Language Learning in the Big-Data Era

LATALL2015

LATALL2015
The Top University Project Office of National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU) will organize a 2-day workshop, as titled above to provide new insights into the trends of learning analytics, pedagogical technology adoption, and technology enhanced language learning in the era of big data.

The workshop will provide researchers and educators with a platform for brainstorming some ideas of how and what kind of mechanisms would be highly innovative and effective in practical applications of learning analytics, acceleration of technology adoption in education, and learning modes of language acquisition in the big-data era. Our previously organized workshops, focusing on virtual worlds enhancing language learning and pedagogical application back in years 2012 and 2014, in Taipei, Taiwan, have gained much resonance. We ensured that a platform we set up these years have already provided a useful and interactive way in the short term. However, to achieve a better understanding and the effectiveness in the fast-pace and big-data era, we believe there are topics that could be discussed further and solutions to be explored in the long run.

DREAM BIG. This is the reason why we hope to gather scholars and experienced professionals in this coming passion-driven workshop in June. All the researchers and educators of language learning, e-learning, and learning analytics are very welcome to join us. We are sure it will be a fruitful harvest.

Important dates

  • Submissions of initial papers due: March 31, 2015
  • Aceptance notifications: April 10, 2015
  • Early Bird Registration: April 30, 2015
  • Final version deadline: April 30, 2015
  • LATALL2015 Workshop: June 23-24, 2015

Topics of Interest

Topics of interests include, but are not limited to:

  • Learning Analytics in pedagogical application
      • Learning process analytics
    • Social network analytics
    • Learning analytics in ubiquitous learning
    • Learning analytics in e-learning and blended learning
    • Prediction, personalization & adaption, intervention, information visualization
  • Technology adoption
    • The trends featured in technology adoption in education
    • K-12, higher education, life-long learning, formal/informal learning
    • Social Media for education
    • E-learning, Open courseware, MOOCs
  • Technology-enhanced language learning
    • Technology-enhanced language skills
    • Platform/system development and evaluation for language learning
    • Modalities for language learning: e-learning and blended learning
    • Augmented/virtual reality and language learning
    • Gesture-based language learning
    • Game-based language learning
    • Ubiquitous language learning

Submission Information

The anticipated types of submissions for the workshop are:

  • Full paper: 5 pages
  • Short paper: 3 pages

Please submit your manuscript using the EasyChair Conference System via this URL: EasyChair.

If you have any inquires, please contact us at latall2015@deps.ntnu.edu.tw

Authors are required to follow the Template that can be found here: MS Word Document and PDF.



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Educational Technology Research & Development. Call for Manuscripts for Special Issue:

Embodied Cognition and Language Learning in Virtual Environments

ETR&D 2015

Special Issue Editors

  • Dr. Yu-Ju Lan, Special Issue Editor, Associate Professor, Department of Applied Chinese Language and Culture, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
  • Dr. Nian-Shing Chen, Special Issue Co-Editor, Chair Professor, Department of Information Management, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan
  • Dr. Ping Li, Special Issue Co-Editor, Professor of Psychology, Linguistics, and Information Sciences and Technology, Pennsylvania State University, USA
  • Mr. Scott Grant, Special Issue Co-Editor, Assistant Lecturer, Chinese Studies, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Australia

Important Dates

Submissions of initial papers duedate EXTENDED: 30 November 2014 December 31st, 2014
Decisions and reflection on the initial papers selected: 31 January 2015
Revised manuscripts due: 28 Feb 2015
Feedback on revised manuscripts: 30 April 2015
Final manuscripts due by the authors: 31 May 2015
Final manuscripts sent to the publishers: 30 June 2015
Special Issue Publication: November-December 2015

Submission Information

Please prepare your manuscripts following the ETR&D Instructions.

Submit your manuscripts via https://www.editorialmanager.com/etrd/.
Select “SI: Embodied Cognition and Language Learning in Virtual Environments” as the article type.

Topics of Interest

Topics of interests include, but are not limited to:
  • Virtual embodiment and language learning (in general)
  • Multimodal communication in virtual worlds
  • Virtual embodiment and language skill development
  • Virtual embodiment, language processing, and brain
  • Virtual motor in language comprehension
  • Embodiment and language in K-12 classroom
  • Embodiment and language in special education
  • New immersive interface technologies such as virtual reality headsets (e.g. Occulus Rift), haptic devices, digital scent technology, facial expression recognition (https://highfidelity.io/) etc., and their impact on embodied cognition.
Questions about relevance and potential topics should be directed to Dr. Lan at yujulan@gmail.com

Background

Sociocultural theory of second language acquisition (SLA) asserts that the social context and interaction mediate language learning and thus play an important role in the SLA process (Ellis, 2008). According to sociocultural SLA, the person and the world are connected in an inseparable relationship (Lantolf, 2005). A context-dependent social interaction is most important to SLA because it provides L2 learners essential scaffolding for acquiring an L2 (Vogotsky, 1978). Swain (2000) suggested that language learning is something that happens both inside the head of the learner and in the world in which the learner experiences the learning. In short, external mediation serves as the means by which internal mediation (mental activity) is originated (Ellis, 2008).

The emphasis of the inseparability of external and internal mediation during context-dependent interaction in sociocultural SLA is in line with the argument of embodied cognition. Embodied cognition emphasizes the formative role of the environment (context) plays in the development of cognitive process (Cowart, 2005), focusing on the “interaction between perception, action, the body and the environment” (Barsalou, 2008), which is different from the traditional perspective where the body plays a small role in cognition. Studies in line with embodied cognition have observed different roles of actions in cognitive processes and have suggested that human mind is closely connected to sensorimotor experience. Based on the general theories of embodied cognition, such as those proposed by Glenberg and colleagues (Glenberg et al, 2004; Glenberg & Goldberg, 2011; Glenberg & Kaschak, 2002) and Barsalou (2008), it is argued that the cognitive process develops under the condition that a tightly coupled system emerges from interactions between organisms and their environment, with the interactions being real-time and goal-directed (Cowart, 2005).

Regarding embodied language processing that a person moving his/her body in a certain way will impact how he/she comprehends language, it is consistent with the content of the indexical hypothesis that an understanding of language results from a simulation of the actions that are implied by the meaning of the sentence (Glenberg & Kaschak, 2002). Increasing evidences obtained from the embodied cognition research support the arguments that action enhances comprehension (Asher, 1997; Glenberg & Goldberg, 2011; Glenberg et al., 2004; Tellier, 2008). In recent years, the findings obtained from brain research also echo that language processing is an embodied process (Aziz-Zadeh & Damasio, 2008; Willems & Casasanto, 2011 ); that bodily action in the contextual environment and perception are inseparable during the cognition process. As suggested by Rueschemeyer and colleagues (Rueschemeyer et al., 2010), intentional actions activating the brain resources used for the motor system are also engaged in the lexical-semantic processing and language comprehension. Additionally, the motor system is automatically activated when a person (a) observes manipulable objects; (b) processes action verbs; and (c) observes the actions of another individual (Mahon & Caramazza, 2008).

Virtual immersion environments, such as Second Life (SL, a multiuser virtual environment) or Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs), have drawn the attention of cross-disciplined researchers (Lan, 2014; Wang & Burton, 2012) because they make both avatar-self movement and different interactions between the learner and the virtual environments possible (Lan et al. 2013). Thus, such environments seem to be able to provide learners an embodied learning experience (Schubert, Friedmann, & Regenbrecht, 1999). In contrast to controlling an avatar via a mouse or a keyboard (like SL and MMORPGs), gesture-based technologies (like Play Station Move and MS Kinect) that mainly involve gestures, or body motion, have also been widely used to support the physical effects on learning (Chao et al., 2013; Chang et al., 2013; Hung et al., 2014). However, the abovementioned embodied motion and the interaction obtained in a virtual environment are accomplished via learners' avatars rather than directly via their own selves. Are the avatar-based embodied motions sufficient and strong enough to originate the essential internal mediation in learners' brains and consequently have an effect on language comprehension and acquisition? Obviously, more cross-disciplinary evidence is needed to answer the abovementioned questions and to add to the knowledge pool of embodied cognition and language learning in virtual worlds.

To this end, this special issue aims at providing a platform for researchers to present their study efforts that may offer insights into the relation between virtually embodied cognition and language acquisition. These are open questions worth of further explorations. The submitted papers will go through a double-blind review. We invite studies that provide research results and contributions that may help develop further understanding of embodied cognition and language learning and inspire future research directions.

Special Issue Guest Editors

Dr. Yu-Ju Lan, Special Issue Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Applied Chinese Language and Culture
National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
Email: yujulan@gmail.com
URL: http://tell.aclc.ntnu.edu.tw/index.php/en/

Dr. Nian-Shing Chen, Special Issue Co-Editor
Chair Professor, Department of Information Management
National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan
Co-Editor-in-Chief, Educational Technology & Society Journal (SSCI)
Chair, IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology
Email: nschen@mis.nsysu.edu.tw
URL: http://www.nschen.net

Dr. Ping Li, Special Issue Co-Editor
Professor of Psychology, Linguistics, and Information Sciences and Technology
Pennsylvania State University
Editor-in-Chief: Journal of Neurolinguistics
Email: pul8@psu.edu
URL: http://blclab.org

Mr. Scott Grant, Special Issue Co-Editor
Assistant Lecturer, Chinese Studies, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics
Faculty of Arts
Monash University (Australia)
Email: scott.grant@monash.edu
URLs:
http://profiles.arts.monash.edu.au/scott-grant/
http://virtualhanyu.com
http://virtuallyenhancedlanguages.com

References

  • Asher, J. T. (1977). Learning another language through actions: The complete teacher's guidebook. USA: Sky Oaks Productions.
  • Aziz-Zadeh, L., & Damasio, A. (2008). Embodied semantics for actions: Findings from functional brain imaging. Journal of Physiology, 102, 35-39.
  • Barsalou, L. W. (2008). Grounded cognition. The Annual Review of Psychology, 59, 617-645. Retrieved from http://www.cogsci.ucsd.edu/~ajyu/Teaching/Cogs202_sp12/Readings/barsalou08_grounded.pdf
  • Chang, C. Y., Chien, Y. T., Chiang, C. Y., Lin, M. C., & Lai, H. C. (2013). Embodying gesture-based multimedia to improve learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(1), E5-E9.
  • Chao, K. J., Huang, H. W., Fang, W. C., & Chen, N. S. (2013). Embodied play to learn: Exploring Kinect-facilitated memory performance. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(5), E151-E155.
  • Cowart, M. (2005, July 8). Embodied cognition. Retrieved April 23, 2014, from http://www.iep.utm.edu/embodcog/.
  • Ellis, R. (2008). The study of second language acquisition (2nd. ed.). New York, USA: Oxford University press.
  • Glenberg, A. M., & Goldberg, A. B. (2011). Improving early reading comprehension using embodied CAI. Instruction Science, 39, 27-39.
  • Glenberg, A. M., Gutierrez, T., Levin, J. R., Japuntich, S., & Kaschak, M. P. (2004). Activity and imagined activity can enhance young children's reading comprehension. Journal of Educational Psychology, 96(3), 424-436.
  • Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. Psychnomic Bulletin & Review, 9(3), 558-565.
  • Hung, I.-C., Lin, L.-I., Fang, W.-C., & Chen, N.-S. (2014). Learning with the body: An embodiment-based learning strategy enhances performance of comprehending fundamental optics. Interacting with Computers. doi: 10.1093/iwc/iwu011
  • Lan, Y. J. (2014). Does Second Life improve Mandarin learning by overseas Chinese students? Language Learning & Technology, 18(2), 36–56.
  • Lan, Y.-J., Kan, Y.-H., Hsiao, I. Y. T., Yang, S. J. H., & Chang, K.-E. (2013). Designing interaction tasks in Second Life for Chinese as a foreign language learners: A preliminary exploration. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 29(2), 184-202.
  • Lantolf, J. (2005). Sociocultural and second language learning research: an exegesis. In E. Hinkel (ed.): Handbook of Research on Second Language Teaching and Learning. Mahway, N. J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Mahon, B. Z., & Caramazza, A. (2008). A critical look at the embodied cognition hypothesis and a new proposal for grounding conceptual content. Journal of Physiology – Paris, 102, 59-70.
  • Rueschemeyer, S. A., Lindemann, O., van Rooij, D., van Dam, W., & Bekkering, H. (2010). Effects of intentional motor actions on embodied language processing. Experimental Psychology, 57(4), 260-266.
  • Schubert, T., Friedmann, F., & Regenbrecht, H. (1999). Embodied presence in virtual environments. In R. Paton & I. E. Neilson (Eds.), Visual Representations and Interpretations. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.
  • Swain, M. (2000). The output hypothesis and beyond: mediating acquisition through collaborative dialogue. In J. Lantolf (ed.): Sociocultural Theory and Second Language Learning. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Tellier, M. (2008). The effect of gestures on second language memorisation by young children. Gesture, 8(2), 219-235.
  • Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological process. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Willems, R. M., & Casasanto, D. (2011). Flexibility in embodied language understanding. Frontiers in Psychology, 2, 116.

Call for Proposal for ETR&D Special Issue 2016

ETR&D calls for proposals annually for Special Issues in the first quarter of each year. Please contact Dr. Tristan Johnson (tri.johnson@neu.edu) or Dr. Michael Spector (mike.spector@unt.edu) for further information. Or consult the journal website clicking here.



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